HBHS Launches Adolescent Intensive Outpatient Program

LITTLETON, CO – Highlands Behavioral Health System (HBHS) today announced the opening of its Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) for adolescents ages 11 to 17.

The new IOP service is the latest in a series of new program offerings launched by HBHS. The 86-bed behavioral health hospital opened its partial hospitalization program (PHP) for adolescents in June, 2014.

Jennifer Fail, Highlands’ Director of Clinical Services, said the IOP program is a logical extension of the hospital’s existing inpatient and partial hospitalization programs. “This new program enables our clinical team to extend treatment to many of our patients who can benefit from extended and intensive therapy offered over a longer period of time,” Fail said.

Highlands’ principle focus remains inpatient mental health crisis stabilization, Fail said, but offering different levels of day therapy programming extends Highlands’ reach into the community. “We can reach more people needing mental health services by offering a broad array of mental health programming and varying levels of therapeutic intensity,” she said. Fail said she expects the IOP to serve community-based adolescents as well as Highlands’ inpatients and PHP clients who “step down” to IOP programming.

A typical IOP program offers group and individual services between 9 and 12 hours each week. IOP allows clients to participate in their daily affairs, such as work or school. Highlands’ adolescent IOP is offered Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays from 4 PM to 7 PM, allowing clients to remain in school while attending the program.

Highlands Behavior Health System is an 86-bed behavioral health hospital offering inpatient and day therapy mental health services for adults and adolescents. HBHS is accredited by the Joint Commission.

 

Psychiatrists Join HBHS Medical Staff

LITTLETON, CO – Two experienced psychiatrists have joined the medical staff at Highlands Behavioral Health System, Littleton, CO.

Ajibade Adeladan, MD, joined Highlands Behavioral Health System on January 5. Maja L. Rudolph, MD, began her tenure at the hospital on January 12.

A native of Nigeria, Dr. Adeladan is Board-certified by both the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology and the American Board of Addiction Medicine. Prior to joining Highlands Behavioral Health System, he served on the medical staff at Prairie St. John’s Hospital in Fargo, ND.

Dr. Rudolph most recently served as Medical Director of the Senior Care Center Geriatric Psychiatry Unit at the Medical Center of Aurora. She is Board-certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, and holds subspecialty Board certifications in both Forensic Psychiatry and Geriatric Psychiatry.

“We are delighted to announce that Drs. Adeladan and Rudolph have joined our medical team,” Paul Sexton, Highlands CEO, said. “They add depth and significant experience to an already-strong psychiatric team.”

Highlands Behavior Health System is an 86-bed behavioral health hospital offering inpatient and day therapy mental health services for adults and adolescents. HBHS is accredited by the Joint Commission.

HBHS Day Therapy Serves Community Youth

Highlands Behavioral Health System’s (HBHS) recently-launched day therapy program for adolescents served twice as many clients this past summer as the pilot program in 2014, according to Paul Sexton, Chief Executive Officer, HBHS.

“We recognized that day therapy for youth is much needed in the Metro South area of Denver,” Sexton said. “We decided in March to launch a permanent day therapy program for adolescents this summer, and we are pleased by the community’s support for this valuable mental health program.”

HBHS piloted day therapy for adolescents last summer to test demand. The program ran from late May through early September, 2014. Once he continued the program permanently, Sexton decided to renovate first-floor space in the hospital for the program.

“We were sufficiently successful last summer to commit to a permanent program, but I wanted discreet space apart from the inpatient units,” Sexton said. “The therapeutic programming and safety needs of day therapy clients differ significantly from our inpatient population. And, I wanted space to grow and to serve more clients.”

Day therapy takes several forms in behavioral health, Sexton said. Partial Hospitalization, or PHP, is a therapeutic step-down program for inpatients who can benefit from more-intensive therapeutic programming than that offered by traditional outpatient therapy programs. HBHS offers separate PHP programs for both adults and adolescents ages 12 to 17, Monday through Friday from 9 AM to 3 PM. Most local insurance plans, including Medicaid, cover PHP programming.

HBHS brands its adolescent day therapy program as C.A.M.P., or Child & Adolescent Mental health Program. The adult program is known as R.E.A.C.H.

HBHS is exploring Intensive Outpatient, or IOP, as its next day therapy program option, according to Kent Hugill, Director of Business Development, HBHS. IOP programs serve those clients who may benefit from therapeutic programming three days per week for three hours each day.

“Intensive Outpatient is a terrific option for those clients who do not require the intensity of our PHP program, but who need more than once-per-week outpatient therapy,” Hugill said. “An IOP program would allow us to serve even more of the local community needing access to mental health programs.”

Highlands Behavior Health System is an 86-bed behavioral health hospital offering inpatient and day therapy mental health services for adults and adolescents. HBHS is accredited by the Joint Commission.

HBHS Co-Sponsors Book Event, Panel Discussion

Over 90 Denver-area therapists and their clients attended a trauma survivor presentation, book signing and therapy panel discussion today at Jubilee Fellowship Church in Lone Tree, CO. The event, entitled Beyond Trauma: Finding Joy and Peace in Your Life, was co-sponsored by Highlands Behavioral Health System (HBHS) and At Peace Therapy Centers, Denver.

Diann M. Kissell, subject of the new book, A Turquoise Life: One Woman’s Triumphant Journey, opened the conference with a presentation on her lifelong journey through periods of surviving, healing and living. The book, written in collaboration with Denver therapist Kathy Bird, LPC, is an account of Ms. Kissell’s childhood experience with sexual trauma and her path to wellness.

Panels comprised of both trauma therapists and trauma survivors discussed various therapeutic modalities employed to treat severe trauma. Included on the therapy panel were Mark Bauman, LPC; Kathy Bird, MA, LPC, CACIII; Melissa Lockman, LSW, MA, CFI, SEP; and Donna C. Read, M.A., CCTP, CCP, ACT/CFT. The four panelists discussed Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), Inner Child and Voice Dialoguing, Somatic Experiencing, and ACT, respectively.

The seminar was the latest in a series of programs sponsored or co-sponsored by HBHS over the past few months in advance of the hospital’s planned Women’s Trauma program. The new program is set to launch in early 2015.

Highlands Behavior Health System is an 86-bed behavioral health hospital offering inpatient and day therapy mental health services for adults and adolescents. HBHS is accredited by the Joint Commission.